Our summer intern, Stephanie Reynolds, has been chronicling her daily experiences at Camp Shutaf. A recent college grad from Toronto, Stephanie has been having a blast experiencing camp and inclusion the Shutaf way. Enjoy!

Today I was wIMG_20150731_182637ith a group and what I observed was the level of diversity within Shutaf. Every activity I did represented an important part of culture from other countries and I thought that was really great. Israel is full of a diverse group of people and so to see that included in camp activities is awesome. We got to make sombreros and salsa for Mexico and we played a few other games. The kids even learned how to say “buenos dias”! I think it’s important to expose children to different cultures because that creates a level of understanding and appreciation. These concepts also create an understanding of what inclusion means because the campers will learn about how to get along and not judge or stereotype. Inclusion is a cornerstone of Shutaf philosophy and unlike many other organizations Shutaf really puts what they believe into practice.

The counselors never force a child to do something they don’t want to but rather let them be themselves. This allows for various types of personalities to blossom creating an even more diverse environment. Shutaf includes campers from all types of backgrounds and the mosaic of this is truly beautiful. I have really noticed the differences coming together. In a country such as Israel and a city such as Jerusalem it is easy to believe or perceive that a lot diversity doesn’t happen but I can say from experience that here at Shutaf diversity is very real.

A Day to Explore

Our summer intern, Stephanie Reynolds, has been chronicling her daily experiences at Camp Shutaf. A recent college grad from Toronto, Stephanie has been having a blast experiencing camp and inclusion the Shutaf way. Enjoy!

IMG_20150731_182637When I got to Camp Shutaf, I was told I had the option of joining a group of young campers or going on a scavenger hunt with the teen camper. I was a little hesitant to leave the camp location but thought a day out exploring would be fun. I’m very glad I made the decision I did, as I got the opportunity to see various sections of the municipality and learn about the history of the area. I got to see the Old City, and in particular the Armenian Quarter which I’ve never seen –  I was really excited and impressed. Thankfully, I was put in a group where the counselors spoke very good English. One of them even gave me a little history lesson about the Armenian quarter which I really enjoyed. Learning about the rich history of Jerusalem and the Old City would’ve been enough but I also got to relax in the shade while eating lunch and a popsicle.

Today was a very different day to my previous experiences at Camp Shutaf but I thoroughly enjoyed myself. I wasn’t running around as much and wasn’t able to communicate as much with crazy actions during activities but I was still so pleased with how the day turned out. Now I don’t know what to do. Do I stay with little campers or do I mature up and go with the teens?

The Best Part?

Our summer intern, Stephanie Reynolds, has been chronicling her daily experiences at Camp Shutaf. A recent college grad from Toronto, Stephanie has been having a blast experiencing camp and inclusion the Shutaf way. Enjoy!

IMG_20150731_182637Interning at Shutaf includes getting to work with many great people at an awesome organization. It’s also offered a combination of experiences, in particular, unpredictability and being flexible. Prior to starting at Shutaf I thought I’d be working on social media but have to come to realize my role is much more diverse than that. Every day you have no definitive idea of what will be asked of you or what you’ll be doing. This is not a bad thing in my opinion because it means you can look forward to every day being a new adventure. You can never get bored with repetition and at an environment such as summer camp being able to adapt is a good quality to have. Being flexible means getting to enjoy the short time you have with the kids that much more.

When I was told I would be going to camp, I figured I would just be on the sidelines, watching and observing. While I do end up doing that (my shyness always gets the best of me), I also get to interact with the kids – today, I got the opportunity to get involved with other activities. I made a  purse out of newspaper which was really fun, and I also had the opportunity to dance again.

The best part? Trying to improve my people skills. I am being forced to break out of my shell and talk to people. The language barrier makes it a little difficult but it is still really fun.

Even more so, I get to experience in a small way, what it is like having a disability in day-to-day activities. Not being able to join in an activity, or feeling left out of something, are experiences that everyone feels at some point but for people with disabilities, they face that exclusion every day. I know I’ll never be able to truly understand the struggle but being at Camp Shutaf is helping me learn. The unpredictability and flexibility required is all a part of this process. Even though I don’t know exactly what I’ll be doing tomorrow, I’m still excited!

One Week Down…

Our summer intern, Stephanie Reynolds, has been chronicling her daily experiences at Camp Shutaf. A recent college grad from Toronto, Stephanie has been having a blast experiencing camp and inclusion the Shutaf way. Enjoy!

IMG_20150731_182637This week was absolutely fantastic! I got to pick up some new Hebrew words, make new friends and just have fun again. I recently graduated from university and am very stressed but working at Shutaf is a nice relief. Being someone one of the interns means I still have some responsibility which is nice, but I can still enjoy myself. Helping out when needed and getting to experience new things was very satisfying. I’m almost tears right now just thinking about how in a few weeks it’ll all be over but I’m also very thankful for this experience so far. Without even realizing it, Shutaf now has a special place in my heart and that thought just makes me really happy.

My First Day with a Group!

Our summer intern, Stephanie Reynolds, has been chronicling her daily experiences at Camp Shutaf. A recent college grad from Toronto, Stephanie has been having a blast experiencing camp and inclusion the Shutaf way. Enjoy!

IMG_20150731_182637Today was a very fun and different kind of day because it was my first whole day with the same group. The ages of the kids are around 8-9 years of age and were full of so much energy. It felt nice to finally have a specific group to be with because it allowed me to bond more with those kids and the counselors. I also got the opportunity to experience a broad range of activities with the same group which made it possible to see the different sides of the kids.

There a few extra special moments today one of which was when one of the kids leaned on me and held my hand while we were in a session with animals. I always heard that children have the best intuition and judgement of character and for a child who doesn’t even know me to trust me like that was very heartwarming. Throughout the day kids were asking me for help and coming up to me which was also a great feeling.  Another fun activity with the kids was when we got to play outside with bubbles. We were playing together and I got to take some awesome pictures. Seeing the smiles on the children was very satisfying. To have children respect me but also enjoy my company without us even really speaking to each other is simply another heartwarming moment.

Campers and counselors alike were engaging in conversation with me and I think it was then that I started feeling really good about the day. Getting to know a few of the counselors was also really great because it allowed me the opportunity to bond with people around my age and I also got to learn a little about life in Israel and at Shutaf. Making new friends is sometimes difficult for me but being with this group at Shutaf was pretty fantastic. Once again there was the obvious language barrier but when you are around certain individuals for a certain amount of time you start to build a great relationship!

First Day Impressions

IMG_20150731_182637Today is my first day of camp. I have the same feelings I did when I was a little kid going off to camp at the beginning of the summer. It’s only been about twenty minutes since I have been here, and I already feel overwhelmed. Not the run-for-the-hills kind of overwhelmed but the kind where you are very excited and nervous for what’s to come. One of the groups I spent time with was with was singing “Hakuna Matata,” and even though they were singing in Hebrew I found myself singing along (in my head in English). For me, being around and hearing something foreign and yet so familiar, like that well-known song, was very comforting. Watching all the kids energetically bounce around reminds me of when I went to camp. That made me so happy because once again I felt as though I could relate even though I could not understand anything that was being said.

What was even more comforting was just how friendly everyone was. Almost half of the staff and campers speak some level of English but even those that couldn’t, still made an effort to come over and make me feel welcomed. I am a very shy person when it comes to meeting people, as well as being in large groups but the friendly atmosphere helped me get through it.

The best part of my day was being in one these blow up plastic balls called “Zorbs”. At first it was just me and the other interns but after a few minutes all these campers came rushing in. They just started pushing me around, and then the staff joined in and it was really fun interacting with everyone in such a friendly manner.

Overall I had a really good day. I was internally freaking out most of the day trying to find my place and see where I fit in within the camp. I think after a few days I will start to feel more comfortable, and really get to enjoy Camp Shutaf for what it is – a really fun and inclusive environment. Within one day, I already feel like a changed person. and I can’t wait to see what the rest of these three weeks will hold!

Stephanie Reynolds is currently a summer intern at Shutaf. A Toronto native, she is in Israel on the ‘Real Life Israel,’ summer program.

“That Word”

Yoni and Gabi

Yoni and Gabi

I recently attended a birthday party for a friend. There were sixteen people at the party — I knew four of them — one’s a very close friend of mine. We were all sitting down to eat when somebody used the word retard.

Of course, I’d heard it, but seeing as the guests were mostly strangers to me, I decided to just move on, and let it go. I convinced myself that this person — this girl-who-used-the-word — didn’t know that she was misusing “that word,” that is, using it in a negative way. My close friend, knowing how I feel about people using “that word” (and I truly believe my friend didn’t mean any harm by it, and did not expect the girl-who-used-the-word to react as she did), jokingly said,

“Yoni, did you hear that?”

I tried to laugh it off instead of starting a debate on why we should or shouldn’t say “that word.”

Which did not happen.

Instead, the girl-who-used-the-word, turned around and asked me why “that word” bothered me?

In an attempt to avoid a major disagreement, I kindly explained that the word “retard” bothers me, and would she use another word. Like many people my age, (I’m 23), she thought that it would be amusing to keep using “that word” to get a rise out of me. I continued to explain that I personally don’t like getting into this kind of conversation with random people that I don’t know, let alone at a friend’s birthday party. Just as in previous situations I have been in, where I’ve heard people justifying the use of the word “retard,” the girl-who-used-the-word began sharing her thoughts;

“But I don’t mean anything bad by it,”

“It’s just a word,”

“It bothers you because you work in that field,”

The last one is what really hit home for me, and I was ready to burst but kept my cool. I wanted to say, “No, it bothers me because I have a sister who’s retarded,” just to see what her reaction would be, and what would be the next excuse she would have for using “that word.” Instead, I resisted, and (slightly more aggressively than before) explained that I have my own personal reasons for my reaction when people use “that word,” and could she please respect my decisions.

At this point, I realized I wasn’t going to change this girl-who-used-the-word’s mind, and that in the process had put myself into an agitated mood.

When I find myself in a situation like this, I like to use a technique that I practice when working with kids. The main point of the technique is to bring the conversation back to something to which both parties can relate — individually and together. I asked the girl-who-used-the-word to respect me as a person, and just use a different word. Just like when you ask someone on the bus not to put their feet on the seat. They might not think it’s a big deal, or see why it would bother someone, but usually out of respect for the other person they’ll take their feet down. People in any setting should be able to have safe conversations with each other — to learn and discuss topics that spur different opinions, and in this case, not put the other party guests in an uncomfortable situation.

I ended up leaving that party feeling very irritated. It wasn’t just because “that word” was used, but that I was put into a compromising position — either abandon my principles or come off as an opinionated person who went off on a rant, lecturing someone at a birthday party.

When I mention “that word,” I am not just talking about the word “retard,” or “retarded.” It’s about so much more than that.

Many of us, myself included (my mother can attest to that), take very little time to consider how our words can hurt someone — with or without our knowledge. Whether it be racially, anti-Semitic, sexist or just a mean word, we should all just take a second, and before we open our mouths, try to respect the people around us.  Like my mother always says, “think before you speak!”

Yoni is the Teen Leadership Coordinator for Shutaf. 

קייטנה לילדים בעלי צרכים מיוחדים מחפשת מקום קבע בירושלים

Author: Dana Pollak. This originally appeared in Walla News, on May 7th, 2015

שתי אימהות לילדים בעלי מוגבלויות הקימו מסגרת שתספק מענה לחופשות ולאחר הצהריים עבור
150 ילדים בעלי צרכים שונים. עכשיו, הן מחפשות מקום קבוע שיגרום להן להפסיק לנדוד, לטענתן לעירייה “לא אכפת”. עיריית ירושלים: “הבקשה תיבחן”1469827-18

מרים אברהם ובת’ שטיינברג, אימהות לילדים עם צרכים מיוחדים חיפשו מסגרת לילדיהם לתקופות חופש – חיפוש שלא העלה פתרונות. לכן, החליטו השתיים לפתוח בעצמן מסגרת עמותת “שותף”. כעת, אחרי שנים של פעילות, הן מחפשות מקום קבוע שיארח אותן בחופשת הקיץ. פניות לעיריית ירושלים, העיר שבה פועלת הקייטנה, נתקלו בדחיות חוזרות ונשנות לקבוע פגישות.

“התחלנו לפעול ב-2007 אבל עד היום לא מצאנו בית קבע”, אומרת שטיינברג, “את הפעילויות במהלך השבוע אנו עורכות בבית ימק”א בעיר ואת קייטנת פסח עשינו במוזיאון הטבע. היה מקסים שם וזה יכול להיות מקום מצוין גם לקיץ, אבל עכשיו מדברים על מכירת הקרקע לטובת בנייה. למה לא להשאיר משהו לטובת הילדים?”

“אנחנו שלושה חודשים לפני אוגוסט והמצב קשה. איש לא רוצה אותנו כשמדובר על תקופה של שלושה שבועות בלבד”, אומרת שטיינברג. “בפסח אנחנו הולכים לבתי הספר, אך בקיץ זו תקופה של שיפוצים לקראת השנה הבאה, אז זו לא אופציה. אנחנו מנסות לדפוק על כל דלת בתקווה למצוא מקום שיקבל אותנו ויהיה בגודל מתאים ונעים לילדים וגם מותאם לצרכיהם”.

את “שותף” הקימו שטיינברג ואברהם, עולות מארצות הברית, בעלת קייטרינג ומעצבת גרפית. תחילה, הייתה זו מסגרת קטנה שמטרתה לספק מענה לכמה משפחות שהכירו שחיפשו תעסוקת אחר הצהריים ובחופשות לילדים. “זה התחיל מעשרה ילדים שהעבירו שבועיים בכייף עם ארבעה מדריכים”, אומרת שטיינברג, “כשדיברנו עם ההורים הבנו שכולם הרגישו שלראשונה מצאו את מקומם. זה התחיל כמיזם פרטי לגמרי והפך למסגרת שהיא הרבה יותר ממה ששיערנו”.

כיום מציעה “שותף” תכניות שבועיות ופעילות בחופשות ליותר מ-150 ילדים ובני נוער עם צרכים מיוחדים בגילאי 21-6 בירושלים. הארגון יצר מודל משולב חדש שבו 75% ילדים עם צרכים מיוחדים והשאר הם ילדים “רגילים”. בין התכניות שמפעילה העמותה ניתן למצוא מועדוניות, קייטנות בפסח ובחופש הגדול, סדנאות שילוב לקהלים שונים ותכנית מד”צים- מנהיגים צעירים עם צרכים מיוחדים.

ייחודה של המסגרת הנו, כאמור, השילוב שבין ילדים עם צרכים שונים באותה מסגרת, שילוב מסוג שלא נראה באף מקום. הדבר מוביל לרשימת המתנה לקייטנה, רשימה שכוללת בעיקר ילדים רגילים. “אחרי הכל, גם הם מחפשים מסגרת ואנחנו נותנות משהו שלא קיים כאן. יש הורים שמבינים את היתרונות”, אומרת שטיינברג.

אברהם מוסיפה: “אנחנו עושות בפועל מה שהאקדמאים ואנשי המקצוע מדברים עליו – שילוב. זה לא רק לקחת ילדים בלי צרכים ועם צרכים אלא גם לערבב בין המוגבלויות. היום, מדיניות הממשלה מונעת שילוב שכזה וזה חבל. זה מוביל לבזבוז כספים כשעושים פעילות אחת לאוטיסטים, אחרת לבעלי פיגור ואחרת לבעלי תסמונת דאון. לכן, אין לנו טעם לגשת למכרזים של העיר או של המדינה כשכל מכרז מגביל אותנו לסוג מוגבלות ספציפי ואוסר עלינו לשלב ילדים עם מוגבלות אחרת או ילדים רגילים”.

“אם לא נמצא מקום גדול מספיק נאלץ לקצר את הקייטנה”

השתיים פנו לעיריית ירושלים במטרה לקבל סיוע באיתור מבנה – אך לא הצליחו למצוא אוזן קשבת. “שנים אני מנסה לשבת עם ראש העיר ולספר לו על העבודה שלנו אך זה לא יצא לפועל”, אומרת אברהם. “יש לנו פגישות עם אנשים בעירייה ממחלקת שיקום ומאגף הנוער, והם יודעים שאנחנו פועלות למען ילדים עם צרכים מיוחדים אך לא ממש אכפת להם. אנחנו מקבלות מהם עשרת אלפים שקלים, אבל למה זה מספיק? הם לא מבינים שאם משקיעים בילדים האלו עכשיו יהיה להם עתיד טוב, הם לא יהיו נטל על איש. אבל היום איש לא משקיע בהם”.

“אנשים בעירייה או גורמי מקצוע לא רואים את הפוטנציאל, לא מבינים שאנחנו הצעד הבא. אבל אנחנו ממשיכות לבדנו”, אומרת אברהם. “אם לא נמצא מקום גדול מספיק או כסף לשכירות למקומות שכרגע אין ביכולתנו לממן ולהתאים לצרכינו, נאלץ לקצר את הקייטנה. אבל זו לא הכוונה”, היא מוסיפה. “אנחנו כאן לספק מסגרת לילדים, מסגרת שתתאים לצרכיהם ותעניק להם את הכיף שכל ילד עושה בחופש הגדול”.

מעיריית ירושלים נמסר: “עיריית ירושלים מאשרת הקצבות על-פי קריטריונים מקצועיים, והעמותה קיבלה הקצבה בסכום של עשרת אלפים שקלים. לעירייה הגיעה רק לאחרונה בקשה מעומתת ‘שיתוף’ להקצאת מקום לפעילותם, והבקשה תיבחן בהתאם לקריטריונים ולנוהל ההקצאות”.

לפניות לכתבת דנה ווילר פולק: danawp@walla.co.il

A homeless NGO: When inspiration doesn’t mean success

Author: Beth Steinberg

This post was originally featured on the Times of Israel on May 5th, 2015

There’s a strange disconnect between inspiring people, doing what everyone says is ‘amazing work,’ and actually succeeding in keeping it going. I guess that’s the nature of founding an NGO,Shutaf Inclusion Programs, something that I did with my colleague and co-founder, Miriam Avraham, in 2007.

Pesach-Camp-2015-AviyahEight years later, we’re proud of our innovative work in the field of inclusive informal education, as well as having grown from a grassroots initiative to a project that offers excellent and professional programs to more than 150 children and young people, with and without disabilities, year-round.

This past Yom Ha’atzmaut, 2015, I was honored to be listed as one of 67 Inspiring Women in Israel by Jewish feminist and author Elana Sztokman. Fantastic, right?

I’m tickled. Miriam and I, along with Shutaf’s dedicated staff, have worked hard. Our Shutaf board was delighted. Of course, we shared the good news via email and social media.

So, what’s the problem? We have no home for summer camp. We have no home. Period.

And I’m running out of inspiring and amazing ideas.

August summer camp, one of our banner programs, offers 3-fantastic weeks for 100 participants. That’s real respite for working parents, at a quality, inclusive-educational program based on the values of American Jewish camping.

When the program was young, we were smaller – finding rental spaces was easier. We expanded because of need, especially in August.

School buildings? They paint and renovate in late August. Not one has said yes.

Community centers? They’re either too small, or too disinterested in what we do to respond to our phone calls and emails.

Green spaces? It’s Jerusalem. There are so few workable locations that are appropriate to our mix of children with varied issues, both physical and developmental. And it’s August. We need shady areas as well as rooms indoor that are air-conditioned.

And you can just forget about accessibility.

I’m thinking of holding camp at Safra Square, the wide-open space at the Jerusalem Municipality downtown. It’s spacious, if a bit too sunny in August. There are bathrooms in the nearby buildings but they won’t like the kids running in and out. It’s not enclosed safely, which means our staff will be spending most of their time chasing after the kids who like to –and need to — run. We will certainly make too much noise but maybe that will make the mayor finally pay attention to the population Shutaf serves, with little help from the city.

We’ve called and written to so many local advocates. Times are tough. The government has only just formed a coalition. The municipality doesn’t know how to categorize us. We’re not a youth movement. We mix participants with a variety of diagnoses. We’ve never applied for municipal tenders – who can meet the criteria anyway?

Who is really thinking about the needs of a small and scrappy NGO that just wants to make August a bit easier for a bunch of children with disabilities? Nobody.

Last fall, we delayed opening our afterschool program because we were homeless after a rough war-torn summer where we hosted camp in a facility which while accessible, proved unwelcoming over a 3-week camp session. Shell-shocked, we looked carefully for a new partner. While we ultimately found a place of welcome, we’ve struggled, as we have every year, with being the ‘renter,’ often shunted to the side as needed.

A visiting foundation representative asked me why we haven’t held a capital campaign in order to fund building or renovating something. I asked him if that would be proper financial stewardship of an organization that still only receives less than 3% of its yearly operating funds from government or municipal sources. An organization that while successful, is far from financially sustainable, even though we’ve managed to grow and find the funds, most of the time, to serve our community of children and young people with disabilities.

There’s so much we could be doing as an innovative and exciting NGO, to truly inspire the community to include, to see difference as less fearful and worrisome than it currently does, if I didn’t have to, along with Miriam and our staff, spend endless hours making phone calls, canvassing neighborhoods for potential buildings, knocking on doors, writing emails and generally wringing our hands.

We hope we’ll find an answer.

The Four Children. Welcoming All Children to the Seder.

By Beth steinberg.
This blog was originally posted on the Times of Israel, on April 2nd, 2015. 

Each year, as we read the parable of the four children, I think about all those other children not mentioned in this historically, simplified description of human behavior.

“One who is wise or thoughtful.
One who is wicked or rebellious.
One who is simple or innocent.
One who does not know how to ask.”
Adapted from A Night to Remember, by Mishael Zion and Noam Zion

The Seder’s Four Children ask us to consider what is wisdom, rebelliousness, simplicity or, even being unable to ask? Emotions and questions that would seem to relate to the average child’s experience of learning and growing, of being and becoming a worthy individual.

The cousins. March, 2015

The cousins. March, 2015

Children. What do we want for them? So much. Make the right choices. Give the right answers. Live up to expectation. Make of yourself something that society values. Excel and shine, learn to be caring human beings, exemplify the wise and thoughtful child of the Four Children. Who would want different?

How do we react when they behave badly? Not well. You’re the evil child.

Get an A? You’re the wise child.

Seem sort of off? The innocent child.

More off? The child who lacks communication, who doesn’t even know how to ask. For so many things.

Becoming, of course, doesn’t happen in an instant. It takes time, along with fostering a range of necessary life experiences for each individual – part of their development and maturation process. Their actions and choices may vacillate, be they wise and unwise. Their big questions may be answered or left unresolved, their personal balance lost or found, their lives opened or kept closed to personal growth. As for their siblings and family members – they’re either carried along with them on their path to adult enlightenment or left behind in the dust of self-discovery. We parents can only leave the door wide open and hope that they will return to ask and discuss those ever so important four questions at the Seder.

While we now have many Haggadic variations on the four children – ones that do consider a different take on the traditional view of childhood and development – the tale of these four children can still be a moment of sadness for those with disabilities (and those who love them) at a Seder, or, of feeling marginalized because these descriptions don’t match their childhood (and parenting) challenges and experiences.

For this year, 5775, I offer up this take on the four children, recognizing that there will always be children who fly under the radar of general acceptance and love.

The one who is wise to people’s feelings, who senses happiness and sadness.
The one who struggles to understand and control their impulses and behavior.
The one who is innocent of unkind thoughts, who greets the world with pleasure and happiness.
The one who wishes to be welcomed and spoken to in public, while lacking traditional forms of communication.

Pesach Sameach.